"Lucayan Indian - Circa 1942"

18 1/2" H x 21" W x 13" D, Edition of 7

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“Lucayan Indian –Circa 1492”, was commissioned by a patron of the arts and donated to The NATIONAL MUSEUM of The BAHAMAS, located in Nasau, New Providence, Bahamas, on July 9th, 2005.

It was to be the first, in hopefully future sculptures, depicting the history of the inhabitants of the Bahamas. It was also the first and only fine arts bronze for the Museum.

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The Lucayans, part of an Arawak culture, inhabited the Bahamian Islands, roughly during 900AD until the early 1500s. They were discovered by Christopher Columbus and his expedition in 1492. They were a tall, strong, people, renowned throughout the Caribbean for their beauty. Lucayans were a kind, generous, giving, hardworking and peaceful people who fought only for the protection of their lives, families and their homes. Because of this, Christopher Columbus wrote to the King and Queen of Spain; “they would make great slaves for your majesties”.

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So, in less then 25 years, all the inhabitants of the Bahamas, short of a handful of crones and children, were taken to South America to work and die in the mines of the Spanish. The few left either died of disease or committed suicide to prevent being taken away from their homes and into slavery.

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This tragedy was almost completely forgotten until recent archeological findings reminded us of the existence of these special Lucayans. A wonderful culture of people, who should never be forgotten, these people were the first substantial, historically recorded settlers of the Bahamas.

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